POC "Doverie" Български
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05/02/2015
"PensionsEurope deeply concerned with developments in Bulgaria"
Pressrelease of the organization PensionsEurope
26/01/2015
Declaration by the International Federation of Pension Fund Administrators (FIAP)
05/03/2015
"Doverie above all"
Daniela Petkova for the "Forbes" magazine
02/02/2013
Solidarity pension systems will not disappear, but will undergo serious reforms
Interview with Daniela Petkova, Chair of the Management Board of PAC Doverie, published in Capital Weekly
Press release Vienna Insurance Group
Unit values for 26.05.2017: GPF "Doverie" - 1.70206 lv.; PPF "Doverie" - 1.73607 lv.; VPF "Doverie" - 1.79552 lv.
Investment
A B C D E F G H I L M O P R S T U W Y Z

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Active Management

The use of a human element, such as a single manager, co-managers or a team of managers, to actively manage a fund's portfolio. Active managers rely on analytical research, forecasts, and their own judgment and experience in making investment decisions on what securities to buy, hold and sell. The opposite of active management is called passive management, better known as "indexing".

Accounting profit

The difference between the revenue received by a firm and the explicit accounting cost incurred. This is the profit listed on a firm's income statement.

Asset management company

A company that invests its clients' pooled funds into securities that match its declared financial objectives. Asset management companies provide investors with more diversification and investing options than they would have by themselves.

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Brady bonds

Bonds that are issued by the governments of developing countries. Brady bonds are some of the most liquid emerging market securities. They are named after former U.S. Treasury Secretary Nicholas Brady, who sponsored the effort to restructure emerging market debt instruments.

Book value of equity

The book value indicates that value which remains for common shareholders after all assets are liquidated and all debtors are paid.

Bond

A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity (corporate or governmental) that borrows the funds for a defined period of time at a fixed or floating interest rate. Bonds are used by companies, municipalities, states and governments to finance a variety of projects and activities.

Bonds are commonly referred to as fixed-income securities and are one of the three main asset classes, along with stocks and cash equivalents.

Bond contract

A contract between the issuer and the buyer of a bond.

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Contract for differences

An arrangement made in a futures contract whereby differences in settlement are made through cash payments, rather than the delivery of physical goods or securities.

Corporate bond

A debt security issued by a corporation and sold to investors. The backing for the bond is usually the payment ability of the company, which is typically money to be earned from future operations. In some cases, the company's physical assets may be used as collateral for bonds.

Corporate bonds are considered higher risk than government bonds. As a result, interest rates are almost always higher, even for top-flight credit quality companies.

Clearing

The procedure by which an organization acts as an intermediary and assumes the role of a buyer and seller for transactions in order to reconcile orders between transacting parties.

Collective investment vehicle

A collective investment vehicle is a way of investing money alongside other investors in order to benefit from the inherent advantages of working as part of a group. These advantages include an ability to
• hire a professional investment manager, which theoretically offers the prospects of better returns and/or risk management
• benefit from economies of scale - cost sharing among others
• diversify more than would be feasible for most individual investors which, theoretically, reduces risk.
(See “Mutual fund” and “Investment company”)

Capital

Financial resources available for use. A mix of a company's long-term debt, specific short-term debt, common equity and preferred equity form its capital structure.

Commercial paper

An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories and meeting short-term liabilities. Maturities on commercial paper rarely range any longer than 270 days. The debt is usually issued at a discount, reflecting prevailing market interest rates.

Central depository

The company that registers the transactions with dematerialized securities, executed on Bulgarian stock exchange. Furthermore, CD maintains a national register of all public companies and their shareholders.

Currency forward

A forward contract in the forex market that locks in the price at which an entity can buy or sell a currency on a future date. Also known as "outright forward currency transaction", "forward outright" or "FX forward".

Currency risk

A form of risk that arises from the change in price of one currency against another. Whenever investors or companies have assets or business operations across national borders, they face currency risk if their positions are not hedged.

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Depositary receipt

A negotiable financial instrument issued by a bank to represent a foreign company's publicly traded securities. The depositary receipt trades on a local stock exchange.

Diversification

A risk management technique that mixes a wide variety of investments within a portfolio. The rationale behind this technique contends that a portfolio of different kinds of investments is expected, on average, yield higher returns and pose a lower risk than any individual investment found within the portfolio.

Deposit (Term deposit)

A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term. These are generally short-term with maturities ranging anywhere from a month to a few years. When a term deposit is purchased, the lender (the customer) understands that the money can only be withdrawn after the term has ended or by giving a predetermined number of days notice.

Duration

A measure of the sensitivity of the price (the value of principal) of a fixed-income investment to a change in interest rates. Duration is expressed as a number of years. Rising yields mean falling bond prices, while declining yields mean rising bond prices.

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Eurobond

A bond issued in a currency other than the currency of the country or market in which it is issued.

Effective yield

The yield of a bond, assuming that you reinvest the coupon (interest payments) once you have received payment. Effective yield is the total yield an investor receives in relation to the nominal yield or coupon of a bond. Effective yield takes into account the power of compounding on investment returns, while nominal yield does not.

Exchange rate

The price of one country's currency expressed in another country's currency. In other words, the rate at which one currency can be exchanged for another.

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Floating rate notes (FRNs)

Bonds that have a variable coupon, equal to a money market reference rate, like LIBOR or federal funds rate, plus a quoted spread.

Fundamental analysis

A method of evaluating a security that entails attempting to measure its intrinsic value by examining related economic, financial and other qualitative and quantitative factors. Fundamental analysts attempt to study everything that can affect the security's value, including macroeconomic factors (like the overall economy and industry conditions) and company-specific factors (like financial condition and management).

The end goal of performing fundamental analysis is to produce a value that an investor can compare with the security's current price, with the aim of figuring out what sort of position to take with that security (underpriced = buy, overpriced = sell or short).

This method of security analysis is considered to be the opposite of technical analysis.

Futures

A financial contract obligating the buyer to purchase an asset (or the seller to sell an asset), such as a physical commodity or a financial instrument, at a predetermined future date and price. Futures contracts detail the quality and quantity of the underlying asset; they are standardized to facilitate trading on a futures exchange. Some futures contracts may call for physical delivery of the asset, while others are settled in cash. The futures markets are characterized by the ability to use very high leverage relative to stock markets.

Forward contract

A cash market transaction in which the contractual obligation to deliver the commodity is deferred in the future. Although the delivery is made in the future, the price is determined on the initial trade date.

Fixed-income security

An investment that provides a return in the form of fixed periodic payments and the eventual return of principal at maturity. Unlike a variable-income security, where payments change based on some underlying measure such as short-term interest rates, the payments of a fixed-income security are known in advance.

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Government security

A government debt obligation (local or national) backed by the credit and taxing power of a country. In Bulgaria, the government securities are offered on primary market auctions organized by the Bulgarian national bank.

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Hedging transaction

A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging transactions purchase opposite positions in the market in order to ensure a certain amount of gain or loss on a trade. They are employed by portfolio managers to reduce portfolio risk and volatility or lock in profits.

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Issuer

A legal entity that develops, registers and sells securities for the purpose of financing its operations. Issuers may be domestic or foreign governments, corporations or investment trusts. Issuers are legally responsible for the obligations of the issue and for reporting financial conditions, material developments and any other operational activities as required by the regulations of their jurisdictions. The most common types of securities issued are common and preferred stocks, bonds, notes, debentures, bills and derivatives.

Investor

An individual who commits money to investment products with the expectation of financial return. Generally, the primary concern of an investor is to minimize risk while maximizing return, as opposed to a speculator, who is willing to accept a higher level of risk in the hopes of collecting higher-than-average profits.

Investment portfolio

A grouping of financial assets such as stocks, bonds and cash equivalents, as well as their mutual, exchange-traded and closed-fund counterparts. Portfolios are held directly by investors and/or managed by financial professionals.

Investment intermediary

A company that provides investment services to clients and performs investment activities as a regular occupation or a business on a professional basis.

Investment company

A corporation or trust engaged in the business of investing the pooled capital of investors in financial securities. This is most often done either through a closed-end fund or an open-end fund (also referred to as a mutual fund).

Investment advice

Investment advice
Any recommendation or guidance that attempts to educate, inform or guide an investor regarding a particular investment product or series of products. Investment advice can be professional; that is, the investor pays a fee in exchange for the qualified professional's guidance and expertise, as seen with financial planners; or, investment advice can be amateur in nature, as with certain internet blogs, chat rooms or even conversations.

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London interbank offered rate – LIBOR

An interest rate at which banks can borrow funds, in marketable size, from other banks in the London interbank market. The LIBOR is fixed on a daily basis by the British Bankers' Association. The LIBOR is derived from a filtered average of the world's most creditworthy banks' interbank deposit rates for larger loans with maturities between overnight and one full year.

Liquidity

1. The degree to which an asset or security can be bought or sold in the market without affecting the asset's price. Liquidity is characterized by a high level of trading activity. Assets that can be easily bought or sold are known as liquid assets.

2. The ability to convert an asset to cash quickly. Also known as "marketability".

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Mutual fund

An investment vehicle that is made up of a pool of funds collected from many investors for the purpose of investing in securities such as stocks, bonds, money market instruments and similar assets. Mutual funds are operated by money managers, who invest the fund's capital and attempt to produce capital gains and income for the fund's investors. A mutual fund's portfolio is structured and maintained to match the investment objectives stated in its prospectus.

Mortgage bond

A bond secured by a mortgage on one or more assets. These bonds are typically backed by real estate holdings and/or real property such as equipment. In a default situation, mortgage bondholders have a claim to the underlying property and could sell it off to compensate for the default.

Maturity

The period of time for which a financial instrument remains outstanding. Maturity refers to a definite time period at the end of which the financial instrument will cease to exist and the principal is repaid with interest. The term is most commonly used in the context of fixed income investments, such as bonds, deposits or loans.

Municipal bond

A debt security issued by a state, municipality or county to finance its capital expenditures. Municipal bonds are exempt from federal taxes and from most state and local taxes, especially if you live in the state in which the bond is issued.

Money market

A segment of the financial market in which financial instruments with high liquidity and very short maturities are traded. The money market is used by participants as a means for borrowing and lending in the short term, from several days to just under a year. Money market securities consist of negotiable certificates of deposit (CDs), bankers acceptances, U.S. Treasury bills, commercial paper, municipal notes, federal funds and repurchase agreements (repos).

Market price

The current price at which an asset or service can be bought or sold. Economic theory contends that the market price converges at a point where the forces of supply and demand meet. Shocks to either the supply side and/or demand side can cause the market price for a good or service to be re-evaluated.

Market (also systematic) risk

The possibility for an investor to experience losses due to factors that affect the overall performance of the financial markets. Market risk, also called "systematic risk," cannot be eliminated through diversification, though it can be hedged against. The risk that a major natural disaster will cause a decline in the market as a whole is an example of market risk. Other sources of market risk include recessions, political turmoil, changes in interest rates and terrorist attacks.

Modified duration

A formula that expresses the measurable change in the value of a security in response to a change in interest rates. Calculated as:

Where:
n = number of coupon periods per year
YTM = the bond's yield to maturity

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Option

A financial derivative that represents a contract sold by one party (option writer) to another party (option holder). The contract offers the buyer the right, but not the obligation, to buy (call) or sell (put) a security or other financial asset at an agreed-upon price (the strike price) during a certain period of time or on a specific date (exercise date).

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Principal

The amount borrowed or the amount still owed on a loan, separate from interest.

Primary market

A market that issues new securities on an exchange. Companies, governments and other groups obtain financing through debt or equity based securities. Primary markets are facilitated by underwriting groups, which consist of investment banks that will set a beginning price range for a given security and then oversee its sale directly to investors.

Preferred stock

A class of ownership in a corporation that has a higher claim on the assets and earnings than common stock. Preferred stock generally has a dividend that must be paid out before dividends to common stockholders and the shares usually do not have voting rights.

Portfolio management

The art and science of making decisions about investment mix and policy, matching investments to objectives, asset allocation for individuals and institutions, and balancing risk against performance.

Portfolio management is all about strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the choice of debt vs. equity, domestic vs. international, growth vs. safety, and many other tradeoffs encountered in the attempt to maximize return at a given appetite for risk.

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Risk-free asset

An asset which has a certain future return. Treasuries (especially T-bills) are considered to be risk-free because they are backed by the U.S. government.

Rights

A security giving stockholders entitlement to purchase new shares issued by the corporation at a predetermined price (normally less than the current market price) in proportion to the number of shares already owned. Rights are issued only for a short period of time, after which they expire.

Risk

The chance that an investment's actual return will be different than expected. Risk includes the possibility of losing some or all of the original investment. Different versions of risk are usually measured by calculating the standard deviation of the historical returns or average returns of a specific investment. A high standard deviation indicates a high degree of risk.

Repurchase agreement (REPO)

A form of short-term borrowing for dealers in government securities. The dealer sells the government securities to investors, usually on an overnight basis, and buys them back the following day.

For the party selling the security (and agreeing to repurchase it in the future) it is a repo; for the party on the other end of the transaction, (buying the security and agreeing to sell in the future) it is a reverse repurchase agreement.

Risk premium

The return in excess of the risk-free rate of return that an investment is expected to yield. An asset's risk premium is a form of compensation for investors who tolerate the extra risk - compared to that of a risk-free asset - in a given investment.

Real interest rate

An interest rate that has been adjusted to remove the effects of inflation to reflect the real cost of funds to the borrower, and the real yield to the lender. The real interest rate of an investment is calculated as the amount by which the nominal interest rate is higher than the inflation rate.

Real Interest Rate = Nominal Interest Rate - Inflation (Expected or Actual)

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Shares

A unit of ownership interest in a corporation or financial asset which gives the holder a voting right. While owning shares in a business does not mean that the shareholder has direct control over the business's day-to-day operations, being a shareholder does entitle the possessor to an equal distribution in any profits, if any are declared in the form of dividends.

Securities administration

The contractual actions related to the exercise of rights under securities such as payment of dividends, coupons, principals, rights, free shares, as well as providing the investors with the financial reports and information about shareholders’ meetings.

Stockbroker

An agent that charges a fee or commission for executing buy and sell orders submitted by an investor.

Secondary market

A market where investors purchase securities or assets from other investors, rather than from issuing companies themselves. Exchanges - such as the New York Stock Exchange and the NASDAQ are secondary markets.

Subscribed

Newly issued securities that an investor has agreed or stated his or her intent to buy prior to the issue date. When investors use rights, they expect to own the designated number of shares to which they have subscribed once the offering is complete.

Stock split

A corporate action in which a company's existing shares are divided into multiple shares. Although the number of shares outstanding increases by a specific multiple, the total dollar value of the shares remains the same compared to pre-split amounts, because no real value has been added as a result of the split.

Settlement of securities

Business process whereby securities or interests in securities are delivered, usually against (in simultaneous exchange for) payment of money, to fulfill contractual obligations, such as those arising under securities trades.

Special Purpose Vehicle/Entity - SPV/SPE

Also referred to as a "bankruptcy-remote entity" whose operations are limited to the acquisition and financing of specific assets. The SPV is usually a subsidiary company with an asset/liability structure and legal status that makes its obligations secure even if the parent company goes bankrupt.

Stock exchange

A form of exchange which provides services for stock brokers and traders to trade stocks, bonds, and other securities. Stock exchanges also provide facilities for issue and redemption of securities and other financial instruments, and capital events including the payment of income and dividends. Securities traded on a stock exchange include shares issued by companies, unit trusts, derivatives, pooled investment products and bonds.

Secured corporate bond

Debt backed or secured by collateral to reduce the risk associated with lending.

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Technical analysis

A method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices and volume. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security's intrinsic value, but instead use charts and other tools to identify patterns that can suggest future activity.

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Underwriting

The process of placement of securities on the capital market.

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Warrant

A derivative security that gives the holder the right to purchase securities (usually equity) from the issuer at a specific price within a certain time frame. Warrants are often included in a new debt issue as a "sweetener" to entice investors.

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Yield to maturity (YTM)

The rate of return anticipated on a bond if it is held until the maturity date. YTM is considered a long-term bond yield expressed as an annual rate. The calculation of YTM takes into account the current market price, par value, coupon interest rate and time to maturity. It is also assumed that all coupons are reinvested at the same rate. Sometimes this is simply referred to as "yield" for short.

Yield curve

A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity dates. The most frequently reported yield curve compares the three-month, two-year, five-year and 30-year U.S. Treasury debt. This yield curve is used as a benchmark for other debt in the market, such as mortgage rates or bank lending rates. The curve is also used to predict changes in economic output and growth.

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ZUNK bonds

They derive their name from the Bulgarian abbreviation of the Law on Settlement of the Non-performing Credits, in force as from December 1993. The non-performing debts of state-owned enterprises accumulated during the pre-reform.


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